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Gnosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

OF THE TRANSCENDENT REALM

 

 

and the

 

 

PROTOPHYSIC MIND

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R.W. Richardson

 

 

 

 

ISBN 0 9522368 1 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cassandra Publications

 

 

 

Physics          Psychology          Philosophy          Poetry          Cosmology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Printed and published in 1993 by

Cassandra Publications

Bishops Lydeard, Somerset, United Kingdom.

© 1991 R.W.Richardson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved.

No part of this publication

may be reproduced, stored or transmitted

without permission of the

Cassandra Publications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preface

 

 

 

Revelation of the Eternal Gnosis

In the Paradise Event.

 

 

*

 

 

Love is resonance within a system

which is devoid of harmonics;

and in which all movement and understanding

is of one frequency and accord

with the fundamental foundation

of all movement and being.

 

Wisdom, is knowing it.

 

 

*

 

 

An exposition of the inner depths of Being

and the

Apodictic Arcanum.

 

 

*

 

 

(Sub Title—The Eternal Gnosis.)

 

 

 

 

 
Introduction
 
and
 
Foundations of Premise

 

 

 

When contemplating on the nature of the truth of reality

one must keep in mind four

Foundations of Premise.

 

 

(1)  The Existential.

 

(2)  The Extant Phenomenal.

 

(3)  The Integrative.

 

(4)  The Mystical.

 

 

1… An observer cannot know objectivity independent of observation.

Thus, from the reference point of the Existential,

reality is as real as experience makes it.

 

2… There has to exist extant phenomena for a subject to observe;

otherwise it would not be an observer;

and irrespective of the absolute nature of the observed.

 

3… A subject is not independent of creation and is

therefore a part of it.

In the act of observing a subject is

an integrative part of what it is observing

i.e. creation observing creation.

 

4… If one would come to ascertain the objective

then it is a prerequisite to know

the limitations of the observer:

for only in knowing what we are

can we then know as to what is objective.

Likewise, if we would come to know our self

then so too must it be known

as to what is not our self.

 

RWR 1991

 

 

 

 

 

The world is an Image Emanation

of the Eternal uncreated essence of perfection.

 

 

*

 

Know thy Self:

for the story of creation

and the story of your self

are one and the same story.

 

 

*

 

 

Before the mountains high and wide,

before the seas did flow;

before the stars gave forth their light,

even then…. I said….

I  KNOW”.

 

 

*

 

 

The incarnate temporal mind has not come

into this universe of time and place simply

to observe it:

But to fulfil it.

 

 

*

 

 

A great Miracle, O Asklepios, is Man.

 

 

*

 

 

 

 

 

I do this in order that you, obtaining and acquaintance with these things, may, in your turn, explain them to all those with whom you are connected, in order to avoid the abyss of such madness and nausea now extant, and rising, from the distortion of the truth of reality and our self.

 

Life is not about mere opinions and beliefs, it is about what is so. It not only behoves us, but is indeed our very nature, to become aware of what is so. In so doing one must act from within the reference point of where one is now placed in the understanding of truth; and negating not that which we now are; and judging not as to where another is likewise located in their growth and integration into the eternal cosmic process of Being.

 

The darkness and ignorance of unknowing is a reality within the nature of the way, and is thus both natural and excusable in human beings. To move from ignorance into understanding is also the nature of the way of reality. But the will to remain in ignorance is neither excusable nor permissible in the nature of the way.

 

*

 

That which I now offer,

has been learned through many years.

I have learned of it through laughter,

and learned of it through tears.

Much is done in ignorance,

and much is done in pain,

but if I had to walk that road,

then I would do it all again.

 

And if you and I do not thus sing

of what sets the heart aglow

then it could well take the children

so long to come to know.

 

One thing, I would ask readers

if I may be so bold,

is to read the lines which follow

in the order which they’re told.

 

RWR